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 People from South Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, and other countries have found refuge from civil war in Kakuma, a refugee camp in the northwestern desert of Kenya. I just returned after spending a month living amongst these people.  While there, I stand along the roadside each morning and watch with curiosity as those from many cultures walk by. They all have endured heartbreak and violence and live in a place they legally may never call home. They face corruption within the system, a lack of food supply, and challenging living conditions, yet they find reason to rise each morning and walk into their day with determination and purpose.  My view is of a thread of road that cuts through a wide expanse of desert and an open sky. Collectively, they seem to define freedom. But the cruel irony is that, bar a handful of refugees, they will never be free to leave this place.

People from South Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia, and other countries have found refuge from civil war in Kakuma, a refugee camp in the northwestern desert of Kenya. I just returned after spending a month living amongst these people.

While there, I stand along the roadside each morning and watch with curiosity as those from many cultures walk by. They all have endured heartbreak and violence and live in a place they legally may never call home. They face corruption within the system, a lack of food supply, and challenging living conditions, yet they find reason to rise each morning and walk into their day with determination and purpose.

My view is of a thread of road that cuts through a wide expanse of desert and an open sky. Collectively, they seem to define freedom. But the cruel irony is that, bar a handful of refugees, they will never be free to leave this place.